On June 20, President Trump held a rally in Duluth, Minnesota supporting Republican Congressional candidate Pete Stauber in the 2018 midterm elections[233] and addressing his own 2020 prospects in the state[234] among other subjects. The rally came on the day the president had signed an Executive Order on the treatment of immigrant families with children.[233] At the rally he said enforcement at the border would be “just as tough" under the Executive Order.[234]
Trump is the beneficiary of several trust funds set up by his father and paternal grandmother beginning in 1949.[82] In 1976, Fred Trump set up trust funds of $1 million for each of his five children and three grandchildren ($4.3 million in 2017 dollars). Donald Trump received annual payments from his trust fund, for example, $90,000 in 1980 and $214,605 in 1981.[82] By 1993, when Trump took two loans totaling $30 million from his siblings, their anticipated shares of Fred's estate amounted to $35 million each.[83][82] Upon Fred Trump's death in 1999, his will divided $20 million after taxes among his surviving children.[82][84][85]
After the rally, fact-checkers found numerous false statements in Trump's remarks.[188][189][190][191] Trump's speech was described as “angry”,[178] "incendiary",[179] “downright scary and disturbing”,[182][186][192] "continu[ing] to divide this country",[193] and "a total eclipse of the facts" (a reference to the previous day's solar eclipse).[194][195] A mostly well-behaved group of protesters gathered outside the rally,[173][196] but after Trump's speech, the police unleashed CS gas on and fired pepper-spray projectiles and rubber bullets at the protesters,[196][197] reportedly in response to a few protesters throwing rocks and bottles at police.[196][197] Saturday Night Live Weekend Update Summer Edition parodied the rally,[198][199][200] and the following week, Bloomberg News reported that Trump punished George Gigicos for the rally's small attendance.[201]
In 1988 Trump acquired the Plaza Hotel in Manhattan for $407 million and appointed his wife Ivana to manage its operation.[130] Trump invested $50 million to restore the building, which he called "the Mona Lisa".[131] According to hotel expert Thomas McConnell, the Trumps boosted it from a three-star to a four-star ranking. They sold it in 1995, by which time Ivana was no longer involved in the hotel's day-to-day operations.[132]

Following Trump's controversial statements about illegal Mexican immigrants during his 2015 presidential campaign kickoff speech, NBC ended its business relationship with him, stating that it would no longer air the Miss Universe or Miss USA pageants on its networks.[204] In September 2015, Trump bought NBC's share of the Miss Universe Organization and then sold the entire company to the WME/IMG talent agency.[205]
David Axelrod, Mr. Obama’s political guru, likes to say that voters usually seek “the remedy, not the replica” of the incumbent. When you consider how much political logic has been turned on its head, perhaps Democrats will nominate a Trumpian figure of their own. Enter the Rock, who inspired the formation of a political action committee to support his presidential aspirations after he announced his intention to run for the White House (albeit in a skit on “Saturday Night Live”).
On September 16, groups supporting Trump organized a rally on the National Mall named the Mother of All Rallies.[209][210][211][212] Organizers were originally hoping to draw one million attendees. However, in planning for security, the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia expected that only 1,800 people would attend and, ultimately, only about one thousand people attended.[212][211] A nearby Juggalo rally drew greater crowds than the pro-Trump rally did.[211][213]
Trump has been slow to appoint second-tier officials in the executive branch, saying that many of the positions are unnecessary. As of October 2017, there were hundreds of sub-cabinet positions vacant.[685] At the end of his first year in office, CBS News reported that "of the roughly 600 key executive branch positions, just 241 have been filled, 135 nominated candidates await confirmation while 244 slots have no nominee at all."[686][needs update]
Trump supports a broad interpretation of the Second Amendment and says he is opposed to gun control in general,[561][562] although his views have shifted over time.[563] Trump opposes legalizing recreational marijuana but supports legalizing medical marijuana.[564] He favors capital punishment,[565][566] as well as the use of waterboarding and "a hell of a lot worse" methods.[567][568]
An August 21 Politico report written by Alex Isenstadt entitled Trump ramping up for 2020 reelection offered new several revelations about the campaign effort.[171] The report discussed plans for an autumn campaign fundraising tour anticipated to rake-in tens of millions of dollars.[171] Pollster John McLaughlin, an advisor for Trump's 2016 campaign, was also appointed to advise Trump's 2020 efforts.[171] The Trump campaign supposedly discussed monitoring individuals listed as being potential 2020 Democratic candidates and Republican challengers,[171][203][204] and reportedly devised a plan to have White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon propose the idea of regulating Facebook as a public utility, a move meant to intimidate Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg into dropping rumored plans to run.[171] The report also said that the campaign and Trump's family members had been meeting monthly with the RNC to coordinate their election efforts, especially in North Carolina,[171] which Trump won by less than 4 percentage points in the 2016 election.[205] Finally, it was mentioned that a large part of the campaign's efforts thus far have involved an expansion of its data program being overseen by Brad Parscale.[171]

On May 9, 2017, Trump dismissed FBI Director James Comey. He first attributed this action to recommendations from Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein,[709] which criticized Comey's conduct in the investigation about Hillary Clinton's emails.[710] On May 11, Trump stated that he was concerned with the ongoing "Russia thing"[711] and that he had intended to fire Comey earlier, regardless of DoJ advice.[712]
Honduran migrants, who were taking part in a caravan heading to the US, board a bus to return to Honduras, in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Oct. 20, 2018. Some 220 Honduran migrants were returning to their country and some 130 were waiting at a shelter Saturday, according to a police source, while thousands who forced their way through Guatemala's northwestern border and flooded onto a bridge leading to Mexico, were waiting at the border in the hope of continuing their journey. Johan Ordonez, AFP/Getty Images
Trump entered the 2016 presidential race as a Republican and defeated sixteen opponents in the primaries. Commentators described his political positions as populist, protectionist, and nationalist. His campaign received extensive free media coverage; many of his public statements were controversial or false. Trump was elected president in a surprise victory over Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. He became the oldest and wealthiest person ever to assume the presidency, the first without prior military or government service, and the fifth to have won the election while losing the popular vote. His election and policies have sparked numerous protests. Many of his comments and actions have been perceived as racially charged or racist.
In 1999, Trump filed an exploratory committee to seek the nomination of the Reform Party for the 2000 presidential election.[354][355] A July 1999 poll matching him against likely Republican nominee George W. Bush and likely Democratic nominee Al Gore showed Trump with seven percent support.[356] Trump eventually dropped out of the race, but still went on to win the Reform Party primaries in California and Michigan.[357][358] After his run, Trump left the party due to the involvement of David Duke, Pat Buchanan, and Lenora Fulani.[354] Trump also considered running for president in 2004.[359] In 2005, Trump said that he voted for George W. Bush.[360] In 2008, he endorsed Republican John McCain for president.[361]
Finally, there is the president’s own policies, which could help trigger an economic crisis. Getting into an all-out trade war with China, the second largest economy in the world, is a risky move that could help blow up the global economy, economists say. The Trump administration has also deregulated the financial sector and passed a tax bill that “overwhelmingly benefited the wealthy and worsened inequality,” according to a United Nations report from June. These tax cuts did help juice the economy, but the stimulating effects will run out by 2020, which could then result in a recession (not particularly good timing for the man who signed the bill).
Trump has been described as a protectionist[502][503][504] because he criticized NAFTA,[505][506] cancelled negotiations towards the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP),[507] imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum,[508][509] and proposed to significantly raise tariffs on Chinese and Mexican exports to the United States.[510][511] He has also been critical of the World Trade Organization, threatening to leave unless his proposed tariffs are accepted.[512][513]
Even Trump’s liberated advisers were causing him problems. The night before Trump rallied in Duluth, Lewandowski appeared on Fox News and responded “womp womp” to a story of a 10-year-old migrant girl with Down syndrome separated from her mother. The comment evoked the casual cruelty of Trump’s immigration policy and promptly went viral. Two sources said Trump was furious that Lewandowski became the story. “He was pissed,” one Republican briefed on his thinking told me. A few days later, Fox News suspended David Bossie after he told an African-American panelist that he was “out of [his] cotton-picking mind” during a segment on Fox & Friends.
On January 10, 2017, Politico reported that Trump would be keeping his campaign offices in Trump Tower open in order to lay the groundwork for a re-election campaign.[17] By that time his campaign offices at Trump Tower already included a staff of about ten people led by Republican strategist Michael Glassner.[17][1] Glassner's deputy is John Pence, nephew of Vice President Mike Pence.[1] The campaign staff was focused on data-building and fundraising for a 2020 reelection campaign.[17][45]
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